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     4 May 2020    Subscribe | Back to Newsletter Acrhive
     

    There is tourism after lockdown

      Bartholomeus Klip

    BK NEWSLETTER

    NEWS FROM THE FARM / VIEW ONLINE

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    Dear {name}, when all the Corona dust will have settled, businesses in the tourism industry will be among the hardest hit. Perhaps now is a good time to try and think about how we can adapt to the changed circumstances, and look at the new opportunities changed circumstances always present.

    If international air travel will seem more scary, and possibly more costly than ever to most of us, local tourism would be an excellent alternative. Especially if you live in a magnificent country like ours! And if big dense crowds seem equally scary, then it will be small towns with small populations and big open spaces that take first prize for local tourists. This is beginning to look much better for tourism, and for Bartholomeus Klip ...

    To that, we should add that if our leisure attention is about to shift to our local communities, why not take this opportunity to support and invest in these communities? BK is already donating food to local charities, and invites you to get involved too (more info below).

    And of course, we also have some news from the farm. Scroll down for news about our Quagga, photos of some of our Elandsberg residents, and rare photos of spiky and spotted visitors to BK.

    FULL BOARD | B&B | HERON HOUSE | WILD OLIVE

    [ TOURISM 2.0 ] There is tourism after lockdown, so why not start planning and dreaming? BK is in perfect company, with Riebeeck Kasteel and Darling - respectively twenty and sixty minutes' drive from Bartholomeus Klip - appearing at the top of the list of villages to visit in the Western Cape  ( source: SA Venues ) The BK office is open for pre-bookings!

    [ DONATIONS NEEDED ] Bartholomeus Klip provides food for the soup kitchen at Goedgedacht farm, and meat and vegetables to community-based non-profit organisation Uplift Hermon, to be handed out to the most needy in our little town. Should you wish to contribute, please contact Lesley at info@bartholomeusklip.com.

    [ QUAGGA ] Resident photographer Mariette captured these images of a breeding group of Rau Quagga at Elandsberg Nature Reserve. This new breeding group is led by the young stallion Neville, who with his very brown coat is one of the new stars in the project. Bartholomeus Klip plays a leading role in the official Quagga Project, and if you want to keep your finger on the Quagga pulse, follow the official project here: facebook.com/quaggaproject/

    [ PLANTING ] Our planting team is still hard at work to get the farmlands around Bartholomeus Klip ready for winter.

    [ ELANDSBERG ] Featured Elandsberg residents

    [ PHOTO : Bontebok ]

    [ PHOTO : Cape Batis ]

    [ PHOTO : Yellow Mongoose ]

    [ SPOTTED VISITOR ] While we usually respect the privacy of guests staying at Bartholomeus Klip, and don't share pictures of them, this shy and spotted guest deserves an exception. Unaware of the camera traps in the reserve, this beautiful leopard looks like a female or a young male, and by looking at the spot patterns we can tell it is not one of the leopards that has been photographed on Elandsberg before (note the distinctive flower rosette on the mid ribs).

    The leopard photo has been sent to the Cape Leopard Trust to see if they can sex and identify it amongst the leopards they are monitoring in the Boland mountains (no reply yet). Like the rest though, this one was photographed at the end of summer, presumably because the mountain habitat is so dry at this time of year that the leopards follow their prey animals down onto the foothills where water is still available in seeps and springs.

    [ SPIKY VISITOR ] Our garden team knows by now that when porcupines visit the BK gardens at night, the next day will be long and hard ... Foraging for anything from bulbs to bark, roots, fruits and berries, porcupines have a way of messing up the lawn, in ways not even an international rugby team would match! 

      

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